Local Independent Destination Management Company: Botswana • Zimbabwe

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Wednesday 16 October 2019

Bumper game viewing predicted for 2020!

The Okavango Delta is an incredibly dynamic ecosystem. Its fluctuating water levels cause vegetation and habitats to adapt accordingly in very short time spans.

The Delta has historically always experienced wet and dry spells, which last roughly 30 years each. We are currently in the tail end of a wet cycle and the exceptionally low rainfall beginning of this year is not unusual according to historical data. Tentative weather predictions are looking positive with better rains this year and a bigger flood in 2020.

A classic Botswana summer thunderstorm.

The current drier conditions we are experiencing are, almost counter intuitively, not bad news. During our exceptionally high flood levels in the early 2000s, large tracts of the Delta were flooded for longer periods of time. This meant that the grazing that occured on the floodplains once the water receded was no longer available for the herbivores and the nutritious grass was replaced by unpalatable sedges (types of mostly perennial but sometimes annual herbs that have a ‘tuft-like’ appearance). This has meant that herbivore numbers actually declined over this period even though the Delta was at its fullest and prettiest.

This year’s exceptionally low floods mean a lot of those floodplains have become accessible and the sedges will die back so that grass can grow again, making the land once again suitable for grazing. The herbivore populations will increase thanks to the extra food, which in turn positively affects the predators. So, while there may not be picture-book Delta water activities everywhere, there has been exceptional game viewing instead.

The upper or northern Delta has received its usual annual floods, albeit in lesser volumes, which means that conditions there haven’t changed as much. 

The lower or southern Delta is affected the most due to the lack of flooding but the newly available grazing will only enhance the game-viewing experience. The reason for this distinct shift in flooded areas between the upper and lower Delta is most likely directly related to the big earthquake Botswana experienced in 2017. Due to the sandy substrate the Delta lies on, even a small shift is enough to divert water flow.

This cycle should see an overall improvement in the amount of grass available as the water-loving sedges die down, leading to the exciting game viewing we all enjoy so much.

With great grazing comes great predator sightings.
Pam Zweerts

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Pam Zweerts

Friday 27 September 2019

The Panhandle: Botswana’s Best-kept Secret

We have long loved the Panhandle and have always considered it a secret gem. It’s a wonderful ‘new’ destination for clients who would like guaranteed water activities like mokoro and boating as well as a gateway to the Tsodilo Hills.

Access

A 70-kilometre watercourse that starts at the Namibian border before spreading out into the Okavango Delta, the Panhandle offers year-round water. Value-for-money lodges and more affordable transfers are now making it extremely attractive. Access used to be a prohibitively expensive but now it’s on par with any other Delta flight, making it a serious option for more cost-conscious bookings.

Experiences

The water experience is unrivaled: guests glide silently through the channels on a mokoro, absorbing the peace, quiet and lush greenery. They can also head out on a high-speed motorboat to experience the vast space opening up in front of them.

The lagoon at Setari

Tigerfishing is a famous and exciting activity in the Panhandle, as is angling for bream and barbal. Birders can train their binos on the densest concentration of fish eagles in southern Africa and look out for multi-coloured narina trogons, kingfishers, African skimmers and Pel’s fishing owls.

In addition, 30-minute scenic helicopter flips here are the same prices as those over the Victoria Falls but with the doors off, giving you clearer, more expansive view and a proper opportunity to trace the channels by air.

Travellers who want more adventure can branch out on a day-trip to the Tsodilo Hills. Declared a World Heritage Site in 2001, these four large outcrops account for the highest peak in Botswana. The Tsodilo Hills have been nicknamed the ‘Louvre of the Desert’ because of the hundreds of rock paintings found here. Clients who are hikers or ramblers can stretch their legs on trails here with a local guide.

The Tsodilo Hills from a Helicopter Horizons’ flight

Accommodation

Upscale options are Nxamaseri Island Lodge and Setari Camp. Nxamaseri is only 37km from Shakawe while Setari is easily accessed on a 35-minute flight from Maun to the Setari Airstrip. Guma Lagoon Camp and Xaro Lodge are favourites for self-drive itineraries, offering down-to-earth accommodation in comfortable canvas chalets and Meru tents. Mopiri Camp is a good mid-range option.

For more details on how to incorporate the Panhandle in an itinerary, please ask your dedicated Safari Destinations consultant. Thank you to Helicopter Horizons for the image of Tsodilo Hills.

Andrea Reumerman

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Andrea Reumerman

Thursday 4 July 2019

#LostInBots

We’re only momentarily disorientated… I’ve been lucky enough to call Botswana home for 7 years now and have traversed most of its dusty roads. However, there are always new gems to explore and last weekend the Makgadikgadi National Park was on the itinerary. This largely underutilised park only has a couple of roads crisscrossing its interior and most of them are long and straight with miles of visibility. Despite these pretty good odds, I still managed to be momentarily disorientated… or in plain English “lost”.

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In hindsight this is actually a pretty impressive feat seeing as there are so few roads and yet we still managed to miss one of them – turns out it was the crucial one. We had booked a campsite in the middle of the park but for some reason we ended up on the Boteti river which forms the western boundary of the park. I’ll never forget when we came out of the ‘woods’ onto a ridge with a very pretty view of a dry river bed. After a moment or two of complementing the view it dawned on me that we were looking down on the Boteti and nowhere near where we were supposed to be. The little cement pillar stating Khumaga office a mere 2km away confirmed this. I couldn’t help but start laughing, almost uncontrollably, at this rather long detour. It was now 15h00, we’d left Maun at 8h30 and still had to cover 60km to get to the campsite and set up camp. Suffice to say the giraffe, gemsbok and elephants we’d passed earlier looked a little surprised to see us again so soon going the opposite direction at a slightly faster pace..

We made it to Tree Island in record time, set up camp and managed to get out onto the pans for a well-deserved sundowner. Nothing beats the open spaces the pans have to offer, there is quite literally nobody around let alone any man-made structures to disturb the endless views. My Dutch friend, who is an avid sailor, likened the emptiness of the park to being out at sea – the grass waving in the gentle breeze reminded him of the waves and if you know enough about astronomy you can easily navigate by the stars. I’ve seen plenty of impressive night skies but on a moonless night like we had, the universe in all its glory makes you seem very small and irrelevant in the larger scheme of things. A feeling that more people should experience more often if you ask me! Boteti blog edited

Back in camp dinner was served and we ended the day with a nightcap around the fire – you’re not camping properly if you’re not sitting around a fire contemplating the days’ adventures whilst hearing lions roar in the background.

The next morning, we left bright and early, changed our second flat tyre and made our way back to the Boteti (we knew the road by heart now..) to catch the annual zebra migration. This natural phenomenon is utterly astounding and quite literally breath taking. Imagine hundreds of zebra and wildebeest making their way down to the river, which isn’t much more than a couple of big puddles and trying to squeeze in between large herds of elephants. We parked our car under the trees, opened our picnic lunches and just sat there for hours watching the spectacle unfold before our eyes. Whilst the zebra, wildebeest and elephants were all jostling for space lions starting calling. I’m convinced they did so just to make the experience all the more surreal for us. Zebras on the banks of the Boteti River

No matter how long I’ve been in Africa for nor how many safaris I’ve done, those hours spent on the river banks watching the spectacular migration in action is something I won’t easily forget. It ranks pretty high in special moments and trust me, this continent has granted me quite a few!

Pam Zweerts

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Pam Zweerts

Monday 1 July 2019

Why 2 nights in Victoria Falls isn’t enough!

Everyone is exhausted after a long-haul overnight flight, often involving multiple connections and inevitably ending in long immigrations queues on arrival. Not to mention the build-up of going on holiday, delayed flights and lost luggage. On arrival, most of us are simply looking for a hot shower, followed by a G&T while we take in our surroundings, ending the day with a good meal and a comfortable nights sleep. IMG_0754

Victoria Falls is the ideal place to kick-off a safari. No onward flights or long road transfers required as most hotels are only a stone’s throw away from the airport. Comfortable accommodation with all the amenities allows guests to ease into their safari experience.  As the properties in Victoria Falls are generally more affordable, there is less of a need to hit the ground running and more time to relax and find your feet. This is especially important when travelling with young children. Compared with the high-pressured start at the top dollar lodges in the Okavango Delta where every minute counts and where you feel compelled to jump on the first game drive on arrival, followed by an early morning wake up call on day one.

After a recent visit to Victoria Falls with my own family, I realized that 2 nights just isn’t enough for first time visitors and especially families to fully appreciate what this corner of paradise has to offer.  I found myself rushing from one activity to the next, pressurized by pick-up times, with little time to relax and yet there was so much more than we could have done.

During our 2 night stay in Victoria Falls, we explored the Falls on foot, by helicopter and by Zip Line and that was about all that we had time for bar a mad dash around the market. There is a big choice of activities on offer beyond the falls themselves, one that I feel is grossly underestimated is the canoeing on the Zambezi River. For families, the falls has lots going on to cater to all ages and interests breaking up the typical safari routine. IMG_0964

Beyond the activities, the town has a holiday vibe, showcasing the country’s culture, local crafts (curio shopping) and a great variety of restaurants, which really add to the experience. Not accounting for the day of arrival and departure which are often lost due to flight times and transfers, one full day simply isn’t enough to take it all in.  I would comfortably recommend a 3-night stay in Victoria Falls town itself.  There is a selection of properties to match all budgets, offering potentially good value for your money, helping to stretch the budget when combined with the top dollar lodges in more remote game areas.

 

Suggested Itinerary

Day 1:     Relax and enjoy a slow start to your safari

Dinner at the hotel

Day 2:     Tour of the falls followed by the flight of angels (12 – 15 minute helicopter scenic)

Lunch at the Lookout Café (which will reopen in Dec 2019 after it burnt down half a year ago)

Canopy Tour / Elephant Interaction / Sunset Cruise

Day 3:     Option 1: Full day upper Zambezi Canoe or Rafting experience

Option 2: A combination of the following with lunch on the terrace at The Victoria Falls Hotel

Horse Riding, Bicycle Tour, Village Tour, Pay It Forward (Family), Bird Watching, Shopping, Bunji Jumping, Croc Farm (Family), High Tea at the Victoria Falls Hotel, and more

 

Independent Dinning Options:

Traditional (Family): The Boma, Jungle Junction

Formal: The Livingstone Room, The Palm Restaurant

Casual: Zambezi House, Three Monkeys, The Lookout Cafe (will reopen Dec 2019)

The same could be said when coming off a safari in the delta. Days of early rising, long bumpy game drives and a day in transit, including the border crossing, is taxing of the best of us. Ending with 3 nights in Victoria Falls to slowly get re-acquainted with civilization before diving back into your daily routine at home is always a good idea.

Guests that have a little bit more time are recommended to spoil themselves with 4 nights in Victoria Falls, the 4 nights could be split between 2 nights in town and 2 nights in the quieter Zambezi National Park. The options are endless, we have put together some stunning itineraries which can be found on our “Best in Travel Zimbabwe 2019”, the packages for 2020 will soon be released.

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Lorraine Potter

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Lorraine Potter

Tuesday 2 April 2019

Get ready for an amazing season!

The Okavango Delta, the largest oasis in the world, attracts large concentrations of all forms of life from the surrounding Kalahari Desert. During periods of flooding plants flourish, animals reproduce and large herds of mammals migrate away from the swamp, to the fringes and to areas in the surrounding desert that benefit from the water that is slowly making its way through the sand.

The exact opposite happens during dry spells! The WaterholeLarge concentrations of animals come together around water pools, receding channels and lagoons. Considering the current water and flood levels and data on rainfall in the Angolan Highlands and the catchment area of the Okavango Delta it is very likely that the upcoming year will be very dry. It looked similar in the late 1990s and early 2000s – and game viewing around the core Okavango was nothing short of spectacular! We were there to see it. Elephants, buffalo, wildebeest and zebra jostling for a place around the precious wet; carefully watched by predators that follow the herbivores and focus ALL their attention around the last remaining watering holes.

You remember all those times when we said: Or should I rather suggest to the clients to travel a bit later? When the game viewing is a bit better? Don’t you think June is maybe too early? Maybe rather September?

In 2019 we are up for a much longer season of enhanced game viewing with less animal movement out of the Okavango, a true premier savanna game drive and superb walking experience. In essence: it will be September from June onwards…..

Sure, the water levels might get too low to conduct boat cruises and mokoro excursions sooner than in previous years in a lot of areas. But there is still a number of camps around, located close enough to the more permanent channels, where your clients can enjoy gliding through the swamp on a mokoro. Our consultants know exactly where to find those camps to add to your clients’ itinerary and where to include mokoro or boating.

But don’t let anybody fool you into believing that a dry cycle in the Okavango is bad news.
It is great news for a photographic safari. Get ready for an amazing season !!!!

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Andrea Reumerman

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Andrea Reumerman

Monday 18 February 2019

MY HONEYMOON OF A LIFETIME (with 28 in-laws)

Ever been on honeymoon with 28 in-laws? Or made promises of the most awesome holiday? Or wanted to make others fall in love with Botswana? Maybe you can answer yes to one of these questions but all three?! That is me: going where others fear to tread!

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I sent my request for this holiday, thinking: “Puuuh! We are a large group. 29 pax! How on earth are we going to fit all those people into safari vehicles and go on safari for 6 nights?” The worst of it: an unhappy safari would mean 28 in-laws mad at me that I overpromised on my beautiful Botswana. So the pressure was on. My national pride was at stake! I love my country and wanted my new family to fall in love with it and to go home raving about this awesome safari experience. The solution to my crazy request was a mobile safari with Bush Ways Safaris!

IMG-20190107-WA0051 copy Xakanaxa Endurance vehicle

The first day of our Bush Ways’ semi-participation safari started with a bang. Eddie and Moscow, our guides, with their assistants, and  our three safari vehicles with big trailers including all safari equipment expected us outside Maun Lodge ready for our journey to begin.  Excitement filled the air! After a briefing of the route of the day, was the vehicle naming ceremony. We were ‘The Xakanaxa Endurance’. I secretly hoped that this was not going to be a journey of me “enduring” unhappy in-laws. In their usual style, Bush Ways’ staff were on time, organised, friendly and informative. So far so very good.

hugo and firewoodHugo and KD chopping some firewood

The first stop of our journey was Khwai. And boy she did not disappoint, revealing some amazing sightings for my new extended family. On day two, we spotted a pride of 17 lions with cubs!! They had killed 4 buffalos the previous night and they were busy feasting when we arrived at the sighting. The cubs were running around with buffalo guts, falling over their feet and haul. Vultures were scavenging around also wanting to join in the feast! Looking around, I saw happy smiling family faces. It was going well.

IMG_0354 2Lion cub having lunch

Next we set off for Savute. It had rained a lot the previous night, so temperatures were just right for game-viewing. The rainy season means loads of babies and that is what we got:  baby giraffes, baby impalas, baby kudu, baby elephants, baby zebra and even six baby hyena in their den with Mom.  A sighting of 2 male lions drew our attention but we caught our breath with the next sighting. It was too good to be true. It was a fully-grown male leopard lying in a tree! Seriously it was too good to be true! That evening, sundowners with the setting of the bright orange Botswana sun, had us all feeling contented. Life was good.

puddlesBye-bye Khwai

Next up was Chobe, ‘the mothership of elephants’. Being the rainy season, I did not expect to see as many elephants as I did! We counted about a thousand elephants: they were everywhere! Moms and babies, teenagers and even the big bulls! All this with the backdrop of spectacular scenery! Interesting was also the amount of giraffe seen. On our way to setup camp, a leopard ran in front of the car and crossed the road to the other side. This had us laughing and cracking jokes: “What’s next, a leopard riding on top of a lion?” Otherwise, we had seen it all.

eli and mumSuncreen for the day baby elephant with its mother

staring leopardLeopard sighting in Chobe

By the 6th night, the last night of our safari, our semi-participation safari had the girls putting up their own tents. Being the bride, I allowed my husband to do that for me!  Our last night meant a special meal for us all. While the food was yummy the entire trip, night 6 was just that extra special. Food is one of my guilty pleasures and each morning I would ask about the meals for the day. On day 6, Moscow whispered into my ear that we would be having seswaa, morogo and phaleche (delicious meat in cabbage and pap), I squealed with excitement! And it did not disappoint. KD, the best chef ever, has gifted hands, he even masters baking a cake with no oven.

nat&steph & kdThe girls taking charge of their tent with KD

And so on day 7, with happy bodies and full hearts, we said good-bye to Bushways, heading off on the next leg of our journey. From the reservations staff, to the guides and guide assistant, offering us superb service and support at each step of the way, and being integral to our adventure, we had been provided with a holiday of a lifetime. Thank you to each one that had made it special. We had more than endured! I had done well!

MoscowOur Guide Moscow 

Caroline Mokaba

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Caroline Mokaba

Wednesday 30 January 2019

From amateur to expert photographer in one morning ;-)

In December I spent a few days in Kasane and had the chance to join a Pangolin morning boat cruise on Chobe river. The funny thing is that although I call a semi-fancy camera my own, which I have used blindly on many game drives in the past, I never actually learnt a thing about taking good pictures. This rainy morning in December was my moment, I knew it. I was super excited to be guided by Guts who is one of the owners of Pangolin Safaris and has years of experience as a photographer. IMG_0983 The Pangolin boats are all equipped with state of the art digital cameras and lenses. Guts and his business partner Toby have created camera-mounts which offer the best possible flexibility for you and your camera. During this three-hour activity the photograhic guides teach the guests how to use the camera and the lens, which settings to use. They explain it in such a way that even beginners like I understood. At the end of the experience the guests get to take their SD card home. If they are keen, they can use the editing suite in the Pangolin Chobe Hotel to start working on their pictures. DSC_6096

Each boat only takes a maximum of eight guests, making the cruises not only educational but also very exclusive. Using smaller boats they generally also travel further on the Chobe river. All guests staying at the new Pangolin Chobe Hotel enjoy these special experiences when booking the fully inclusive package. Generally on a two-night stay all guests would join two cruises (morning and afternoon cruise) plus a game drive.  The Chobe river can get busy, especially in the afternoons when all the Kasane Lodges take their clients on boat cruises. To avoid the crowds, Pangolin takes their guests further and also offers the alternative of quieter morning cruises.

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To make the most of this experience and to really have an impact on the rest of your clients’ safari we suggest to include Pangolin Chobe  at the beginning of an itinerary. This way your clients can learn from the best and apply all they learnt during the rest of their safari. They will love Botswana even more and return home with fantastic memories. image2

 

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Carina

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Carina

Wednesday 19 December 2018

Sunset on Setari

Perfectly positioned to watch the sun go down while sipping on a gentle gin & tonic or cooling off in the sparkling swimming pool after a sun-soaked day. Let the mind slowly unwind, the body recover and the soul rejuvenate! Rediscover tranquillity at the newly opened Setari Camp, located on a picturesque island in the Northern Delta. SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

We had the pleasure of staying at Setari recently and were thoroughly spoilt with delicious food, a selection of drinks and heart-warming hospitality. The tents are spacious, well-appointed with everything you need and very private from the next.

There is a private viewing deck in front of each tent with endless views over the floodplains; the ideal spot to put your feet up, read a book or just relax and take in the stunning scenery. For those wanting to burn off some unwanted calories, there is a small gym on site…but even I could not drag myself there! WhatsApp Image 2018-12-19 at 08.37.32

This camp is suitable for just about anyone, raised high off the ground, it is safe for children to move around freely between the tents, the main area and the swimming pool. Children can take part in boating, seasonal fishing and village visits, while there is also the option of mokoro activities and bush walks for adults. One of the greatest advantages at Setari is the year-round water availability which means boating and mokoro throughout the year.

Those wanting to wind down after a busy safari, will find their haven at Setari and equally those on honeymoon can enjoy the privacy and tranquillity in one of the remotest parts of the Delta.

Kick back, relax and ENJOY! Setari Camp settles the soul…  SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

 

Fast Facts:

– Setari opened in October 2018

– located in the waterrich region of the Okavango Panhandle, a birders paradise

– 8 double tented suites and 1 family suite

– activities: motor boating, mokoro excursions, guided walks and village visits

 

 

 

Claire Robinson

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Claire Robinson

Friday 26 October 2018

Be prepared … we tested the new Tracks4Africa app

Driving through Botswana can present some challenges – difficult road conditions, destinations far apart from each other, remote areas and confusing “road” networks. All the more important is it to be thoroughly prepared and use the tools at hand to make sure your journey will be the safari of your dreams.

One of the priorities of our recent self-drive adventure was to test the different tools available. We were super curious to test the app that everybody is talking about – Tracks4Africa. We compared it with the Shell Maps, our maps (which are great as a back-up) as well as the Garmin GPS. During our self drive trip through Savute, the Caprivi, and the Panhandle it became very quickly apparent that the Tracks4Africa app is a very effective tool!

The app is very user friendly and the best about it, it works offline! Even in the remotest areas, the app connects the dots via GPS signal and allows people travelling to easily find their way around the complicated and sometimes a bit chaotic bush network.

Scarlet & Brinny finding a satellite phone signal

Scarlet & Brinny finding a satellite phone signal

Tracks4Africa allows to search by accommodation, places, GPS coordinates, or when you see on the screen where you would like to go, you can simply tap on the screen and it will calculate the route for you. You also have the option of putting in so called “way points” along your way. This way you can literally map out your entire trip beforehand and it will lead you from stop to stop. The indicated estimated driving times are very accurate and if it changes along the way due to rest stops, slower driving etc. the system simply recalculates.

We know that some clients struggle with the costs for the app. It currently costs USD 50, but this includes regular updates. The app covers many African countries including South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe and many more. Users purchase it once and can use it again and again.

Driving through the bush, the app was most reliable. The ways leading up to the lodges usually are not mapped as some lodges do not advertise themselfes as self drive lodges, but by using the SD self drive maps with the accurate GPS points for the lodges, following signs or asking at gates even that was easily manageable.

For next season we are considering putting together self drive-kits including the paper maps of Tracks4Africa as well as the guide book. This can be pre-ordered through Safari Destinations and the clients would receive it on arrival. Our recommendation however is that clients study their itinerary beforehand, downloading the app (available for Android and iOS) and make themselves familiar with their route. Botswana is a demanding destination when self-driving and proper preparation is everything. IMG_0101

 

Scarlet Backes

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Scarlet Backes

Friday 26 October 2018

“To self-drive or not to self-drive: That is the Question!”

We have been debating the hot topic of self drives for years. The trend seems to be that more and more clients have independently travelled South Africa and Namibia by car, and as a result they think visiting Botswana in the same style is the natural conclusion. Botswana is wilder, has less infrastructure, less tarred roads, is a much more challenging destination. Self-driving in Botswana is for the adventurous, people that want a guarantee to see the amazing game in Botswana should always choose to travel with a guide,  self-driving is possible in the National Parks and Game Reserves, the famous private concessions in the Okavango Delta or Linyanti can only be accessed by plane and visited with a professional guide.

As your partner on the ground we selected a group of brave individuals to go and explore some of the parks of Northern Botswana, their mission was to test a variety of maps available in the local shops, the Tracks4Africa’s app, our self drive maps and the directions we hand out. IMG_0083

This is the first of a series of blogs about “Self-Driving in Botswana”, we will write about our experiences, the road conditions, the user-friendliness of the maps and Tracks4Africa app and much more, enjoy the ride…

Here is Seeletso’s impression of his first self-drive-adventure:

When I was initially asked if I would like to join a self-drive educational from Maun across Savute to Ngoma and into Namibia then back through the Panhandle to Maun I didn’t hesitate for a second. I was only concerned about traveling in the extreme heat of October (we often get more than 40 degrees in our so-called suicide-month), and the stories I had been told of people getting stuck in the thick sand in Savute and Chobe. The last time I was in Savute was in 2002 as part of a Wellness Club in High School where we put up sign posts to guide everyone visiting the Savute region, so this was an opportunity to revisit this area and to check if our signs were still around or the elephants had destroyed them. image001

Cometh the hour, cometh the man… my moment had come. I joined Tlotlo, Brinny and Scarlet on this adventure. Being the farm boy that I am, I nominated myself to drive all the way  through the park to Ngoma in Chobe. A Wild Wheels car was delivered and handed over the day before our trip, a Toyota Hilux double cab with 2 roof tents and plenty equipment. The handover is vital to make sure that all equipment needed for the trip is in the car and works properly. The vehicle came with a GPS system loaded with Tracks4Africa maps, a satellite phone, fridge, high-lift jack, spade, sand ladder and other necessary tools. We also got a proper briefing on how to use the tools, how to lower the tyre pressure. When hiring a vehicle from a local Botswana operator the equipment is guaranteed to deal with the conditions in the parks in Botswana. Clients choosing to travel through the parks need to make sure they have the right equipment. Ready, we left Maun early morning for our first destination, the recently reopened Belmond Savute Elephant Lodge (yes SD travels in style). The drive from Maun via Mababe to Savute took us about 5 hours of solid, but not fast, driving. After the Mababe Gate (guests that stay in lodges usually travel with a voucher from the lodge confirming that park fees have been paid, at the Gate only the payment for the vehicle needs to be made, it helps to have Pula at hand, the costs for locally registered vehicles is 10 Pula a day, foreign registered vehicles are 50 Pula a day) it became a little more challenging as the thicker sand began. We reduced the tyre pressure from the normal 250 to 180 bar. IMG_0095 The Sandridge road is the most direct and easiest way to Savute even though the thick sand there has been a challenge to many. I was up to the challenge and hoping to get photos of us being stuck. To my surprise the sand was not that tough, I do not know if it was my bush baby driving skills or the Hilux just performed better than I had expected. With the vehicle on four wheel drive the stretch was easy enough.

The main challenge of the road was a few kilometers after the Savute Gate on the side track which took us to Belmond Savute Elephant Lodge. Apparently, the trucks that came in for the rebuild of the lodge are the reasons for the state of the road. Extremely thick sand with deep burrow tracks, but nothing to worry about as long as you are driving a 4×4. From Savute to Ghoha Hills there is no thick sand, but the road requires one to drive at slow speed as it is bumpy and uneasy.

Savuti Sunset

Savuti Sunset

At the Ghoha Gate it is advisable to ask the Wildlife officials which is the better route, as the direct route is not in great conditions. Here you drive left (north west) towards the Linyanti cutline and once on the cutline turn right and the road leads you all the way to Kachikau village.  Before Kachikau the tarred road comes back to life and at the nearest fuel station we pumped back the tyres to 250 bar. After a night at Chobe Elephant Camp the crew crossed over to the Caprivi Strip in Namibia then spent a few nights in the Okavango Panhandle and back to Maun. The border crossings at Ngoma into Namibia and Mohembo back into Botswana were all smooth and quick. The A3 road from Shakawe to Sehitwa has lots of potholes even though there were few patches of roadworks there and there. (We will speak more about the Panhandle section in a coming Blog).

 “Insider tips from your local experts”

  • It is advisable to not self-drive in the rainy season, the terrain is difficult and chances of getting stuck in mud or having to cross water  are high.
  • Make sure your car is loaded with all the necessary equipment before you depart for your Safari (e.g. tools, GPS, satellite phone, working fridge, lockable doors, spare wheels), check all is in a good working condition. 
  • When switching from tarred/gravel road onto sandy roads reduce your tyre pressure and when going back on tarred road remember to increase the pressure.
  • On sandy roads please switch onto H4 for 4-wheel drive at all times, if sand is too thick and car fails engage Low range to avoid getting stuck, the next car might only come by after 24hrs. 
  • Respect the animals on the road, especially Elephants.
  • Do not stop and get out of the car in bushes, find a clear open space for your safety.
  • Always ask the people working at the entrance gates which road is better or how do you proceed forward.
Seeletso Rakonche

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Seeletso Rakonche

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